Analysis of the XB funding contributed by “non-state donors”, which are broadly defined as subjects that are not member states. XB resources donated by non-state donors increased steadily over the four biennia period from 2002-2003 to 208-2009.

Largest Recipient Organizations of Non-State Donors Resources

This series of graphs below ranks the top beneficiaries of XB contributions from non-state donors excluding resources donated by EC.

5c.6. XB Resources from Non-State Donors - By Organization

Top 10 Beneficieries - All Donors Excluding EC, Total: 6,222 Millions USD, Biennium 2008-2009

75 per cent of all 2008-2009 XB contributions from non-state donors excluding resources donated by EC were received by a group of five organizations: UNDP, WHO, UNICEF, WFP and FAO.

5c.7. XB Resources from Non-State Donors - By Organization

Top 10 Beneficieries - 5 Major UN System Orgs. & Dev. Banks, Total: 2,162 Millions USD, Biennium 2008-2009

Two largest organisations who gained from internal transfers of resources within the UN system were UNICEF and WFP, who together received 44.5% of contributions in the category B – 5 Major UN System Organizations and Development Banks.

5c.8. XB Resources from Non-State Donors - By Organization

Top 10 Beneficieries - 5 Major Other Orgs, NGOs, Private Sect., Total: 2,376 Millions USD, Biennium 2008-2009

The list of organizations showing greatest capacity to attract external non-state funding includes WHO and UNDP, which combined accounted for 56.4% of contributions in the category C - 5 Major Other Organizations, NGOs, Private Sector.

5c.9. XB Resources from Non-State Donors - By Organization

Top 10 Beneficieries - 10 Major Donors Excluding EC, Total: 4,538 Millions USD, Biennium 2008-2009

The graph shows organizations which achieved low fragmentation level of contributions from non-state donors.

 

 

Trend of Resources from European Commission

Appreciating the fact that the European Commission is the largest non-state donor of the UN system as a whole and in line with the FAFA agreement, the contributions from EC are duly segregated for reporting and analysis.

Over the four biennia, EC biannual contributions to UN system organizations have tripled, from USD 1.1 billion in 2002-2003 to USD 3.3 billion in 2008-2009. The graph shows linear growth trend of contributions after relatively faster increase from the biennium 2002-2003 to the biennium 2004-2005.

5d.1. XB Resources from European Commission - UN System Organizations

Biennia 2002/03 - 2008/09, Millions of USD

Largest Recipient Organizations of European Commission Resources

In large degree, EC contributions are targeted to a relative small number of recipient organizations: 2008-2009 contributions to UNDP (USD 757 million) and to WFP (USD 711 million) account respectively for 22.6% and 21.2% of the total resources given by the EC; together they represent almost half of the contributions to the UN system organizations.

5d.2. XB Resources from European Commission by Organization

Top 10 Beneficieries, Total: 3,350 Millions USD, Biennium 2008-2009

Largest Non-State Donors – Aggregate 2002-2009

The graph identifies the top 10 non-state contributors from category B – UN system organizations and Development Banks-, along the four biennia from 2002 to 2009; from 1st to 10th : UN; UNDP; World Bank; OCHA; UNAIDS; UNDG; UNDHA; CERF; UNDG – Iraq Trust Fund; and UNDHA/INOCHI. The data indicate that exchanges of resources within the UN system and between UN system and development banks follow the trend of previous years of taking place in the humanitarian and economic development areas of intervention.

5e.1. Top 10 Non-State Donors of XB Resources, Category B - UN System Organizations and Development Banks

Biennia 2002/03 - 2008/09, Millions USD

The graph represents the top 10 non-state contributors from category C – other IOs (non UN system organizations or Development Banks), NGOs, Foundations, Private Sector - along the four biennia from 2002 to 2009. From 1st to 10th: UN Foundation, Inc (Ted Turner Funds); The Global Fund against AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria; Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; Foundation Remembrance; non-specified private donors; Rotary  International; Multilateral Fund for Montreal Protocol; Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI); UNITAID (International Drug Purchase Facility); and GEF (Global Environment Facility).

5e.2. Top 10 Non-State Donors of XB Resources, Category C - Other Organizations, NGOs, Foundations, Private Sect.

Biennia 2002/03 - 2008/09, Millions USD

Non-State Donors Exceeding Contributions of $10m

The graph lists the donors that contributed more than USD 10 million in 2002-2009. 24 donors in the group include: UN Foundation, Inc (Ted Turner Funds); The Global Fund against AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria; Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; Foundation Remembrance; non-specified private donors; Rotary  International; Multilateral Fund for Montreal Protocol; Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI); UNITAID (International Drug Purchase Facility); Global Environment Facility (GEF); Hoffman La Roche & Co LTD; Settlement Fund - Holocaust Victim Assets Litigation; Independent Electoral Commission for Iraq; OPEC; Micronutrient Initiative; Nippon Foundation; UAE Red Crescent Society; Kobe Group; Public donations - Criança Esperanza; World Lung Foundation; US Committee for UNFPA; Palestinian Authority/PLO; Pan American Health & Education Foundation; and International Development Research Centre

5e.3. Non-State Donors that Donated more than 10mln USD in years 2002-2009

Category C - Other Organizations, NGOs, Foundations, Private Sect., Millions USD

Extra Budgetary Resources Trend – Non-State Donors

Four main classes of non-state donors have been identified for organizations reporting their contributions:

A) European Commission – as a largest non-state donor, and in line with FAFA requirements, a separate category is dedicated to EC;
B) 5 major non state donors from “UN system organizations, World Bank, IMF and development banks”;
C) 5 major non-state donors from “other International Organizations, NGOs, foundations, private companies, other entities”;
D) All remaining non-state donors other than the EC or the 5 major donors in categories B and C.

This classification allows:

1) to distinguish the main donors of XB resources among different categories of organizations;
2) to analyse the level of concentration/fragmentation of contributions from non-state donors; e.g. some UN system organizations receive resources from few major donors, while others have many donors providing relatively smaller amounts of resources.

XB Resources from Non-State Donors - UN System

Biennia 2002/03 - 2008/09, Millions of USD

Reference: 5a.1.

The graph presents the XB contributions received by UN system organizations over the four biennia period from “non-state donors”, broadly defined as subjects that are not member states. The XB resources donated by non-state donors constantly increased over this period. Total recorded contributions to UN system soared from USD 4.4 billion in 2002-2003 to USD 9.6 billion in 2008-2009. The XB funding experienced a notable 50.4% increase from non-state donors between 2002-2003 and 2004-2005. A further growth at an average of some 20% per biennium was recoreded for 2006-2007 and 2008-2009.

XB Resources from Non-State Donors by Category

Biennia 2002/03 - 2008/09, Millions of USD

Reference: 5a.2.

Largest Non-State Donors in 2008-2009

The graph shows the detailed per biennium contributions made in the four biennia period 2002-2009 by the top 10 non state donors to the UN system organizations.

Data presented in the graph reflect trends over time of the size of contributions granted by the major non state donors to the UN system organizations. Most donors, such as the UN Foundation Inc. (Turner Funds), The Global Fund, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Rotary International, had their contributions progressively increase along the considered period representing stable support to the UN system activities. The Foundation Remembrance has scaled out their contributions as of 2007. Other entities, such as the International Drug Purchase Facility (UNITAID) has launched its contibutions over the last two biennia while the Global Environment Facility (GEF) has significantly increased contributions in the last biennium.

5e.4. Top 10 Non-State Donors of XB Resources, Biennia 2002/03 - 2008/09

Category C - Other Organizations, NGOs, Foundations, Private Sect., Millions USD

The graph shows the top 20 contributors from donor category C during the biennium 2008-2009. The majority of donors are also present in the above graph capturing contributions for the four biennia, however, their ranking has somewhat changed. The first 10 contributors of the group combined contributed USD 2.2 billion during the biennium 2008-2009 (or 32 per cent of total contributions from this group). Donors listed in places 10 to 20 of the list each contributed during 2008-2009 between USD 5 million and USD 25 million.

5e.5. Top 20 Non-State Donors of XB Resources, Category C - Other Organizations, NGOs, Foundations, Private Sect.

Biennium 2008-2009, Millions USD

 

 

Largest Recipients of Non-State Donors Contributions

The graph shows XB contributions from all categories of donors and focus on the main organization beneficiaries of these contributions within the United Nations system.

The top ten beneficiaries of XB resources from non-state donors in 2008-2009 were: UNDP, WFP, WHO, UNICEF, FAO, UNHCR, UNRWA, UN, UNFPA and IFAD. As a whole, these organizations received XB contributions of USD 8.9 billion in this biennium, the 91% of the total XB contributions to the UN system organizations. The three largest recipient organizations – UNDP, WFP and WHO – together received USD 4.9 billion, representing about a half of the contributions to the whole UN system.

5b.1. Top 10 Beneficiaries of XB Resources from Non-State Donors

Millions of USD, Biennium 2008-2009

Increase Level of Contributions from Non-State Donors

In the period 2002-2009 there has been a significant increase in the annual contributions granted by non-state donors to UN organizations. Assessing the UN system as a whole, the biannual contributions more than doubled from USD 4.4 billion in 2002-2003 to USD 9.8 billion in 2008-2009.

The graph ranks XB contributions for 2008-2009 in terms of per cent against contributions for 2008-2009. Resources biannually received by the top ten organizations having the largest contribution increase over the four biennia showed a significant increase from 2.5 (UNU) to 15 (UNEP) times their 2002-2003 XB non-state contributions. However, it should be highlighted that most of the top 10 organizations are relatively small and their increases are explained by their low level of XB non-state contributions in 2002-2003. Exceptions are relatively larger UNDP and UNICEF, their non-state XB contributions grew 5-6 times in comparison with contributions received in 2002-2003.

5b.2. % Increase of Biannual XB Contributions from Non-State Donors

Variation 2008-2009/Base 2002-2003, Top 10 Organizations

The graph reveals the largest organizations by absolute increase of 2008-2009 XB non-state contributions in relation to contributions received in 2002-2003. Three organizations recorded increases in their annual XB non-state contributions above USD 500 million: UNDP – USD 1,799 million; UNICEF – USD 993 million; and WHO - USD 720 million. Three other organizations had an increase between USD 250 million and USD 350 million – FAO, UNHCR and UNRWA, while the other organizations experienced increases between USD 100 million and USD 200 million.

5b.3. Increase of XB Contributions from Non-State Donors

Variation 2008-2009/Base 2002-2003, Top 10 Organizations, Millions USD

Receipts of Extra Budgetary Resources by Organization

The below graphs show the detail of the annual XB contributions from all categories of non-state donors between 2002-2003 and 2008-2009. The organizations are grouped in three graphs consistently with their scale of contributions received from non-state donors (USD 180 million or more; between USD 18 and USD 180 million and under USD 18 million per biennium).

Majority of the organizations with contributions of USD 180 million or more experienced an increase in their contributions received from non-state donors, with the exception of WHO and the UN Secretariat, their contributions received have slightly dropped in the biennium 2008-2009. WFP experienced uneven level of XB non-state contributions received over the four biennia.

5b.4. XB Resources from Non-State Donors

Biennia 2002/03 - 2008/09, Millions of USD

 

Most of the organizations from this group saw their XB non-state contributions rising over the four biennia. ILO, UNEP and UNODC had significant increase of their contributions in the biennium 2008-2009, while UN-HABITAT’s contributions were steadily reducing for the last three biennia.

5b.5. XB Resources from Non-State Donors

Biennia 2002/03 - 2008/09, Millions of USD

 

Organizations of this group did not show strong trend in their XB non-state contributions pattern. While on average over the four biennia there was growth observed for UNAIDS, UNITAR, WMO, UNWTO, WTO, UNFCCC; picks of XB non-state contributions received were experienced by ITU (biennia 2002-2003 and 2008-2009); ITC (2006-2007), WMO, UNWTO and WTO (all in 2008-2009).

5b.6. XB Resources from Non-State Donors

Biennia 2002/03 - 2008/09, Millions of USD

Resources Breakdown by Category of Non-State Donors

The graphs below show the distribution by donor category of contributions received in 2008-2009 by the top 10 beneficiaries of XB resources from all non-state donors.

Looking at the breakdown by donor category, European Commission’s contributions have the highest weight on total contributions from non-state donors; on average they account for 32.9% of the resources received by all organizations, or, in absolute terms, they account for USD 3.3 billion in the biennium 2008-2009. UNDP and WFP are the two main beneficiaries of EC in absolute, while UNRWA, IFAD and UNHCR received more than 50% of their XB non-state contributions from EC.

The 5 major donors from category B (UN system and Development banks) and the 5 major donors from category C (other International Organizations, NGOs, foundations, private companies, etc.) account both for 21%-25% of the resources from non-state donors of the top 10 beneficiaries. WFP and UNICEF lead as the two main beneficiaries of contributions from large donors of category B (WFP - USD 450 million or 29% of total resources received by the organization from non-state contributors and UNICEF - USD 525 million or 44%).

UNDP, WHO, UNICEF and UN are the main recipients of contributions by big donors of category C (UNDP – USD 587 million or 28% of total resources received by the organization from non-state contributors, WHO – USD 737 million or 60%, UNICEF – USD 294 million or 25% and UN – USD 149 million or 39%).

The weight of contributions from last category of donors – D all remaining non-state donors other than the EC or the 5 major donors in categories B and C – gives back a good approximation of the level of fragmentation of contributions received from non-state donors.

UNDP, FAO and UNFPA appear to be organizations with high level of "fragmentation" (respectively with 30%, 25% and 71% of non-state contributions).

UNICEF, UNHCR, UNRWA, UN and IFAD have a high level of "concentration" of XB resources – contributions from their largest non-state donors and EC account for more than 90% of their total XB non-state contributions.

5c.1. Top 10 Beneficiaries of XB Resources from Non-State Donors


XB by Donor Category, Biennium 2008-2009, Millions USD

 

5c.2. Top 10 Beneficiaries of XB Resources from Non-State Donors

XB by Donor Category, Biennium 2008-2009, Percent Distribution




Detailed Non-State Donors Receipts by Organization

The three graphs below show the distribution of XB resources from non-state donors received by UN system organizations from the following categories of donors:

A. European Commission – as largest non-state donor and in line with FAFA agreement’s requirements, a separate category has been dedicated to EC;
B. 5 major non state donors belonging to "UN system organizations, World Bank, IMF and development banks";
C. 5 major non-state donors belonging to "other International Organizations, NGOs, foundations, private companies, other entities";
D. All remaining non-state donors other than the EC or the 5 major donors in categories B and C.

These graphs allow analysis of:

1) the main sources of XB non-state contributions for each organization in terms of donor category; and

2) the level of concentration or fragmentation of contributions from donors of categories B and C (balance between resources from major 10 contributors and all other contributors).

5c.3. XB Resources from Non-State Donors - By Donor Category

Biennium 2008-2009, Millions USD

5c.4. XB Resources from Non-State Donors - By Donor Category

Biennium 2008-2009, Millions USD

5c.5. XB Resources from Non-State Donors - By Donor Category

Biennium 2008-2009, Millions USD